Tag Archives: Oslo

Travel must be a part of the solution

Humans are explorers. Travel allows us to see the world in a different way and experience new things together. 

 

After the Business for Peace #FutureOf Travel event, attendees were left thinking about the convenience of travel compared to its environmental impact and how this may influence our decisions as consumers. Our pull to explore our world and learn more doesn’t have to be compromised, but various players in the industry need to do their part, too. How do companies incentivise sharing our personal car, for example, in order to reduce the number of cars on the road? 

 

 

We hosted this event to talk with industry professionals about what they are doing to combat the potential negative effects of travel. Therefore, our panel consisted of experts from a broad range of industries within the travel sector. It included Anders Fagernæs from Norwegian airline, Astrid Bergmål from Virke tourism association, and Ane Furu from Møller Mobility Group. Our moderator was author and founder of 12YEARS, Petter Gulli. 

Future of travel panel and moderator

Our panel: Astrid Bergmål, Anders Fagernæs, Petter Gulli, and Ane Furu. Photo: Trym Schade Warloe

The conversation started with an acknowledgement that effective and open cooperation within the industry needs to happen immediately. There must be a balance between environmental arguments and societal value. Fagernæs explained how “sustainability is a divisive topic. If we have to set goals together, I need to trust the person next to me, so it is important that we understand each other. I think we shouldn’t focus on travel as being bad. We need to look at the solutions.”

 

Our desire to explore the world certainly isn’t something to be ashamed of. As Bergmål put it: “People will always want to meet. We are explorers. Travel must be a part of the solution when it comes to [the Sustainable Development Goals]. We want to know other cultures, understand more, get to know people. It is the glue for many families.”

 

“It is easy to make excuses,” Bergmål says. “The footprint has to go down, and the emission has to be zero. By not travelling, we are taking away focus from the real solution.” Fagernæs argues that we are not flying more domestically, but tens of thousands of jobs in Norway alone require travel in their work. “Think about businesses and their livelihood. It is important to understand the impact and that we have to live with some environmental cost to make it work.” One-day business travel continues to increase. However, the more convenient something is, the less likely consumers are to seek out alternatives.

Panel debate underway

Astrid Bergmål, with Anders Fagernæs and Ane Furu in the background. Photo: Trym Schade Warloe

 

 

 

Yet there continues to be a high number of flights made available. If flights continue to be high-carbon contributors, then the solution needs to be sought elsewhere. Being flexible with shared solutions and relying on startups will bring new services that are tailored to people’s needs. Fagernæs admits that although aviation is only 2% of global emissions “we need to fly smarter, make use of the newest technology.” Would people choose trains more if trains were faster? Bergmål thinks so: “Politicians should work more on getting more train routes, domestic and international. Trains don’t go that often and it takes too long.” Stockholm-Oslo is today a six-hour journey, but plans are in the works for making this a mere four-hour connection. Securing a train route from Oslo to Copenhagen, for example, would make train travel to the rest of Europe even quicker.

 

Furu mentioned that in her own personal convenience scenario, she used to happily drive to work via car from her home in Grunerløkka, near Oslo’s city centre. However, once the local government made this everyday commute of hers into an inconvenience, she promptly looked for alternative solutions and started using public transit as an alternative travel solution.

 

Furu further points out that “More than 80% of the population is living in rural areas. We need to travel for our daily lives.” We therefore need to make sure that there are better ways to provide transport for people living in rural areas. Furu reiterates that it is important to think strategically about how to share assets and to utilise a fleet in an efficient way. This beneifts both business and consumer. “Remove friction from car sharing to make it more convenient. Norwegians don’t want to sit together when they travel, but we can reduce the boundaries for sharing assets.We need regulators to dedicate parking space.”

Ane Furu talking to Petter Gulli

Consumers have a responsibility as well. This responsibility mostly lies in pushing companies and legislators to solve the problem–and trusting them to follow through. “As a person I have my wallet and have my vote. As a consumer I can choose the smartest way to travel,” Fagernæs said.

 

Bergmål wants consumers to make businesses “Can we skype more? Should I take the train instead? I can organise my life to have more meetings in one destination?” Businesses need to think in terms of the everyday. This also lessens the pressure on the individual consumer, “rather than taking away someone’s holiday.”

 

The audience was interested in a breadth of recurring issues, more ideas, and solutions. Electric planes and city transit, for example. One question about batteries for electric vehicles, for example, asked whether the pollution from creating those batteries was justifiable. This is just the beginning of this discussion. The intriguing Q&A session, plus the panel talk in its entirety, can be found here:

 

People will and should continue to travel in the future. However, this travel needs to be smarter and more sustainable. We achieve this by utilising new as well as existing innovative solutions. These solutions ensure the future of our planet.

 

Thanks to everyone for coming out to participate! Photo: Trym Schade Warloe

Thanks to everyone for coming out to participate! Photo: Trym Schade Warloe

 

travel.door

It’s always a full house at MESH. Photo: Trym Schade Warloe

 

 

 

 

 

Cancelled Event: The Future of Oil

Dear friends,⁠

We have made the difficult decision to cancel the “Future of Oil” event scheduled for 24 March in light of precautions due to the COVID-19/Coronavirus. We feel a deep sense of responsibility to our community and therefore believe that cancelling this event now is the responsible thing to do.

 

The plan is to re-convene this same panel at a future date once the COVID-19 situation changes. Follow our Facebook page to be notified when the new date is scheduled. We appreciate that so many of you are interested in this conversation and look forward to hosting this event at a later date.

 

 

Photo: Trym Schade Warloe

Photo: Trym Schade Warloe

Join us on the 24th of March at this free event to hear from business leaders, travel policy experts, and civil society, including speakers:

– Adrian Falck, Advisor at Footprint (Moderator)

– Thina Saltvedt, Chief Analyst, Sustainable Finance at Nordea

– Stein Hernes, Vice President, Corporate Sustainability at Equinor

More speaker announcements coming soon!

It’s the latest #FutureOf talk series presented by Business for Peace and MESH. The event is free to attend, but donations to help cover the cost of the event can be made here.
Please RSVP to let us know you’ll be joining us: link here.

Programme

17:30-18:00 Doors open, come mingle and get settled
18:00-19:00 Talk and discussion

Stick around and continue the conversation

 

Stick around and continue the conversation
For updates on the latest events, sign up for the Business for Peace newsletter here.

The event is free to attend, but please RSVP on Eventbrite to let us know you will be joining us.

Join the event page on Facebook for ongoing updates.


 

Looking for Volunteers for the 2020 Business for Peace Summit

Business for Peace 2016.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All the Business for Peace employees were super helpful, giving me extra information and guidance throughout the event!

Roberta, past Volunteer

 

We worked in a nice atmosphere and were allowed to listen to all the discussions, which was great.

Anna, past Volunteer

 

I felt included, valuable and appreciated by the Foundation!

Ulla, past Volunteer

Business for Peace is looking for enthusiastic volunteers to be part of the Business for Peace Summit in Oslo. Are you interested in joining us the 13th and 14th of May, 2020? Send a short CV and cover letter to jobs@businessforpeace.org. Deadline for this year’s applications is Friday 3 April. More information about our volunteer programme is below.

 

Business for Peace Summit 2017. Professorboligen.

 

The Business for Peace Foundation seeks to unlock the positive power of business in society and inspire a higher form of capitalism. Our vision is that all business leaders make improving society their purpose. This requires being businessworthy – to create value both for business and society in an ethical and responsible way.

 

Business for Peace 2016.

We are looking to create a team of talented individuals who believe that we can make the Summit a truly memorable experience. We require a commitment of 2-3 days or evenings for orientation prior to the Summit, and then another 48 hours of volunteering during the Summit in Oslo.

Find out more about past Summits here and take a look at the 2020 Summit website here.

 

 

Business for Peace 2016.

Volunteer tasks include:

  • Guiding and supporting our VIP guests throughout the Summit and Award Ceremony

  • Guest registration

  • Working with the social media and our Communications team

  • Supporting speakers, guests, and participants with relevant information and other hands-on tasks as required

 

 

Necessary Qualifications Include:

  • Familiarity with Oslo and its facilities (either based in Oslo or have lived here)

  • Reliable and friendly with a professional and proactive attitude

  • Comfortable working both in a group and independently

  • Enjoy working with people from all walks of life

  • Have excellent time management skills and adaptability to face-paced environments

  • Computer literacy, including Microsoft Office tools

  • Knowing more than one language is a plus!

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Through volunteering, we offer an opportunity to make a difference and be part of building a global movement for change. Look forward to:

  • Building new job market skills, including event management

  • Receiving a written testimonial at the end of the volunteer period

  • Working with an experienced team of professionals who can provide constructive feedback and career advice

  • Interaction with leading speakers and thinkers in business and sustainability

  • Enjoying a special celebration for our volunteers after the Summit

 

Please send an email to barbora@businessforpeace.org for further information. We look forward to hearing from you! 

Application deadline: 3 April.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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